Pre-Norman crosses of West Cheshitre and the Norse settlements around the Irish sea.
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Pre-Norman crosses of West Cheshitre and the Norse settlements around the Irish sea. by J. D. Bu"lock

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Published by LCAS in Manchester .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsLancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18157290M

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Pre-Norman crosses of West Cheshire and the Norse settlements around the Irish Sea. Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society Wirral and its Viking Heritage. J D Bu 'lock. J.D. Bu'Lock () Pre-Norman crosses of West Cheshire and the Norse settlements around the Irish Sea. Reconstructed from fragments, an Anglo Saxon cross in the churchyard of St Barnabas', Bromborough. Other Saxon stones, and later period, are kept in the parsonage garden, according to the NMR. This cross is scheduled as Historic England List ID and recorded as Pastscape Monument No. Bu'lock, J. D., `Pre-Norman crosses of west Cheshire and the Norse settlements around the Irish Sea', Trans. Lancashire Cheshire Antiq. Soc., LXVIII, 1– 11File Size: KB. Pre-Norman Crosses of West Cheshire and the Norse Settlements around the Irish Sea, (). Reading the Past, Cambridge,Author: David Wyn Griffiths.

Bu’Lock, J D Pre Norman crosses of west Cheshire and the Norse settlements around the Irish Sea Johnston, Frank R St Mary of Eccles - a medieval parish Clarke, J W Cheshire bells: Part VI Bagley, J J Matthew Markland, a Wigan mercer: The manufacture and sale of Lancashire textiles in the reigns of Elizabeth I and James I Jarvis, Rupert C The Mersey bridges: File Size: KB.   ‘Pre-Norman crosses of West Cheshire and the Norse settlements around the Irish Sea’, in Cavill et al , 70–83 Carroll, J, Harrison, S H and Williams, G (eds) The Vikings in Britain and Ireland, Thames & Hudson, LondonCited by: 4. It is bounded to the west by the River Dee, forming a boundary with Wales, to the east by the River Mersey, and to the north by the Irish Sea. The roughly rectangular peninsula is about 15 miles (24 km) long and 7 miles (11 km) wide. Historically, Wirral was wholly within Cheshire; in the Domesday Book.   Pre-Norman crosses of West Cheshire and the Norse settlements around the Irish Sea,Cited by:

A little further south at the Church of St Mary and St Helen at Neston is a collection of five fragments from at least three Hiberno-Norse crosses and at St Barnabas Church at Bromborough is a reconstructed cross often claimed to be of Scandinavian origin but the church is outside the Wirral Viking boundary and in reality a wheel-head Saxon cross. missed by historians. The origin of the name is Old Norse (gamall – “old” or man’s name Gamall) is listed as a pre-Norman conquest Cheshire landowner in the Domesday Book as Gamel (see Tait, ; Wainwright, ). Scandinavian names persisted well after the Norman Conquest and their names appear in Medieval Documents. A John Gamel appears. Meanwhile, many of the Viking settlements developed and grew into towns. Their town of Dubhlinn had a thriving Norse community by the second half of the s, and had become the principal supplier of slaves in the British Isles. In time it became a great merchant town, until it was defeated by an Irish . The Wirral boasts a number of picturesque villages, the pleasant village of Brimstage has a craft centre housed in a medieval tower. The large village of Bromborough, which is mentioned in the Domesday Book, is a candidate for the site of the epic Battle of Brunanburh, a great English victory over the Anglo-Viking preaching cross dating from around the tenth century stands in the.